BUILDING ON STRENGTHS IS BETTER THAN FOCUSING ON WEAKNESSES

Our Better Way proposition:

Even in the most difficult circumstances people and communities have much to offer. They are well placed to come up with the solutions, and to take action accordingly. Defining people by their ‘needs’ or deficits, and doing things for or to rather than with them, creates dependency. Creating conditions where people can flourish on their own terms sets them free.

Insights about our proposition….

Asset based approaches recognise and build on the existing strengths within communities, and start with what is valued most to those living in that community. To read more …

Traditional approaches to community development come from a perspective of a community’s problems and needs, which only exacerbates issues they are facing.   To read more …

Traditional approaches to community development have developed as vertical models of intervention, and are becoming increasingly expensive and unsustainable.   To read more…

Asset based approaches have relevance outside of community development.   To read more …

Asset based approaches have far reaching benefits for individuals and communities, and society more broadly.   To read more …

Asset based approaches put people and communities at the centre of services, focusing on their needs and aspirations. This person-centred approach is gathering traction across public services. To read more …

Current structures and ways of working act as barriers to successful asset based community development, as do the challenges of ensuring meaningful inclusive participation and evaluating and measuring the impact of asset based approaches.   To read more …

Examples of asset based community development in action include: Croydon ABCD Pilot Project; Link Up, Inspiring Scotland; and valuing nurses as assets: The Buurtzorg care model.  To read more...

We want to generate more insights and examples about our propositions. Do please get in touch with any thoughts or additions.

Shaking things up a bit: some discussion points for a Better Way

Does the voluntary sector itself tend to characterise those its serves negatively, as problems to be solved?  If so, why?

What would an asset based narrative for charities look like?

How can we change the culture of services to better promote an asset based approach?

What needs to change in funding arrangements to foster this approach?

Do you have views on these questions - or are there other questions we should be asking?